roasted beet soup

Spring is here and I’ve got little baby beet seedlings in the greenhouse but I can’t wait 65 days for them to make beets.

Roasted beet soup-7So until then I’m getting organic beets at the store. They are a vegetable, in my opinion, that spans all seasons. We ate this roasted beet soup hot and cold and both were delicious. So if you’re still freezing your tush off- heat it up. If you are in CA and it’s gone straight from winter to summer- keep it cool.

PRINT RECIPE: {ROASTED BEET SOUP}

  • 1½ lbs roasted, trimmed beets (about 4-6 medium-lg beets)
  • 2 ½ qts chicken stock- or veggie if you prefer
  • 3 T olive oil
  • 5-6 cloves garlic
  • 1 T honey
  • 1 tsp apple cider vinegar
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 1/8 tsp white pepper
  • 2-3 T sour cream or crème fraîche

It is super simple. The beets are roasted with skin on. I like to cook a couple extra while I’m at it. I’ll cube them and have them to add to salads during the week.

Roasted beets

I use my current everyday organic olive oil Olivar de la Luna

Olivar de la Luna olive oilAnd I’m working through our garlic harvested last July. It’s starting to recognize that spring is here and beginning to germinate but it’s still very usable. I do “degerm” it by removing the green germ you see there. It just starts shooting up the middle where if in the ground it would continue to push through the soil. I’ve heard if you remove the germ it makes you less “gassy” but don’t hold me accountable to that one! And remember you don’t have to even peel for this recipe:)

olive oil and garlic-2After roasting I’ll let the beets cool and then skin them.

Roasted beet soup-2The garlic is actually just thrown in whole and I squeezed a little of the soft garlic into the puree but your oil and beets are strongly garlic scented.

Everything is pureed into a lovely smooth soup- it’s not rocket science here.

Roasted beet soup-6

I love garnishing with a little creme fraiche or sour cream using a little piece of plastic with a whole at the tip. Don’t worry about a pastry bag- You make little dots like this on your soup

Roasted beet soup-4Then swipe through them with a toothpick for a sweet little design

Roasted beet soup-5And then after about 10 seconds of everyone going awwww that’s so sweet. They dig their spoons…But if you noticed this one had swirls… no hearts.

Roasted beet soup-8And I’ll leave you with a fun shot Ollie snapped while following up the rear on our woods walk with the gang…cheers xx

goat walk

Summer harvest begins!

Here we are already ending the first week of July. The garden is going gangbusters and we’re loving every minute and every morsel. We’ve been enjoying greens since March, peas over the last month and the broccoli has actually gone to seed now. But for me when the root veggies start showing their true selves, I feel summer harvest knocking at the door. These baby carrots and beets are only moments shy of fully maturing. We are devouring the first zucchinis, blissfully ignorant to the idea of the late August green giant overload. We have Green zucchini, Costata Romanescos with the racing stripes, and Scalloped green/yellow pattypans soon to arrive. Unfortunately, I mismarked the yellow crookneck and they seemed to have gotten lost in the shuffle.

Harvest dinner 7-7-2013-2

Continue reading

Donna Hay Photo Challenge #9 Goat Cheese, lemon and pea Pasta

***UPDATE***  I’m pulling out the pasta pea bit from my last post so it’s not smushed in between the cabin and the salmon and the …..And you may still get another one later today for the berry tart bake off! Where did June go??? Ok… just pretend like you’re surprised 🙂

Yes, I did make MORE pasta and had a lovely but challenging afternoon taking photos of it. It was like a haircut you keep having a go at and never feel you get quite right… except with less long term effect.

Here is the link to the Donna Hay photo challenge at Jungle Frog Cooking.

And here is the original picture-

The image comes from the summer issue of Donna Hay’s issue 55 (febr 2011). The photo is taken by William Meppem and styling by David Morgan.

And this is my go at it 🙂

And this is the one I couldn’t decide on…

And here’s the rest of it you’ve already seen….

Here’s the recipe but head over to Junglefrog if you want to Print. You should go over there anyway because it’s a great site.

Ingredients

  • 400g penne
  • 420g frozen peas (2 cups)
  • 2 cloves garlic (crushed)
  • 2 tablespoons lemon rind (finely grated)
  • 2 tablespoons lemon juice
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 240g goat’s cheese (crumbled)
  • 50g rocket (arugula, chopped)
  • sea salt
  • cracked black pepper

Boil up you noodles of choice… regular semolina or one of the many gluten free varieties. The recipe called for Penne but I like the twists… And get yourself some peas! I love using pea shoots for the green and Donna Hay used Arugula. I also added cut up snow peas giving it a little crunch.

I used fresh shelling peas, snap peas, and pea shoots all from local gardens. I used to love growing pea shoots for salad. You can even do this in a pot of the porch.

A little olive oil, fresh garlic, lemon juice and zest, fresh goat cheese and did I mention PEAS!

It’s a simple dish that can be made ahead of time and served at room temp or warmed up a bit…

Thanks for your patience in my need to make this happen on the LAST DAY of JUNE!
Tschüß,

For the love of Kale…..

For the love of Kale…..

Ok… I’m at it again. I’m loving making these videos. I will probably continue unless I hear how boring they are to normal people. Well, honestly, then I may still continue doing them because they are self gratifying. So I’d love to get some feedback. Or not. No really I want it…. thx wt

I’m placing it here, up top, so you have the option to watch…. or you can scroll past to the recipes.

Kale is in. In season. In fashion. Just plain in. It’s a funny thing kale. It’s a great summer salad and really can be grown in the pacific Northwest at least, and I’m sure here in Germany, year round. Just at the peak of heat, it bolts, but usually there’s another patch just coming up and it’s only a short kale eating pause. (Baby  red russian kale in summer is great raw in green salads.) But we think of it being “in season” in winter. Certainly here in Hamburg, it’s out in kilo size bags.  I think because it is also often the garden Savior. The plant you can knock the snow off of and still harvest. It’s even sweeter after a frost. It has to be very very cold to kill the kale. And it only asks for a light cover such as remay (lite woven fabric) to give that bit of protection to hold out through the freezes.

Continue reading

%d bloggers like this: